INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP SUPERVISION

Judith provides clinical supervision to individual therapists and clinicians from differing disciplines, group supervision to multidisciplinary mental health and trauma teams. She brings her experience in working in tertiary level mental health with children, young people and adults who have experienced trauma, neglect and attachment disruption. As a systemic family therapist Judith prioritises a relational perspective, including focus on relationships within and between members of the family system, the wider systems, and the therapist. Supervision may also be informed by her international credentials as a supervisor in Open Dialogue and dialogical practice. Supervision takes various forms according to the needs of the individual or group, including:

SYSTEMIC SUPERVISION

  • A method of supervision which is focused on systemic theory and practice, including systemic conceptualisation and development of systemic skills.

Reflective Supervision

  • A method of supervision which enables a reflective space, within which to reflect on the therapeutic work and the therapist.

DIALOGICAL SUPERVISION GROUPS

DIALOGICAL & SYSTEMIC SUPERVISION

  • A method of supervision which is informed by both dialogical and systemic theory and practice of family therapy, as devised by Judith based upon her PhD methodology.

SUPERVISION WITH THERAPIST AND FAMILY

  • A method of supervision in which both therapist(s) and client(s) engage together in a structured reflective conversation on the therapeutic work.

SANDPLAY SUPERVISION

  • A method of supervision which involves non-verbal processing followed by verbal exploration of the therapeutic work, particularly useful when therapists are stuck or wondering.

 
 
‘The importance of the spoken word, I think, is grounded in the fact that it does not want to remain with the speaker. It reaches out towards a hearer, it lays hold of him, it even makes the hearer into a speaker, if perhaps only a soundless one ... We tend, to be sure, to forget that something can happen not merely ‘to us’ and ‘in’ us, but also in reality ‘between’ us’.
— Martin Buber